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Advisory Board


Tilo Bachmann
Administrator, European Patent Office

Robert Barr
Executive Director, Berkeley Center for Law and Technology, Berkeley Law School
Former Vice President for Intellectual Property and Worldwide Patent Counsel, Cisco

John Bracken
Program Officer, MacArthur Foundation

Dennis Crouch
Patently-O
Visiting Assistant, Professor Boston University Law School
Associate, McDonnell Boehnen Hulbert & Berghoff LLP

Sean Dennehey
Patents Director, UK Patent Office

John Duffy
Professor of Law, George Washington University Law School

Will Fitzpatrick
Corporate Counsel, Omidyar Network

Alan Kasper
Vice President of the Board of Directors, American Intellectual Property Law Association
Partner, Sughrue Mion, PLLC

Stephen G. Kunin
Special Counsel, Oblon Spivak
Former Deputy Commissioner for Patent Examination Policy, USPTO

Mark Lemley
Director, Stanford Program in Law, Science and Technology
William H. Neukom Professor of Law, Stanford Law School

Stephen Merrill
National Academies

Michael V. Messinger
Director, Sterne, Kessler Goldstein, & Fox P.L.L.C.

Marcus Mueller
European Patent Office, EPO Scenarios for the Future Project

Gideon Parchomovsky
Professor of Law, University of Pennsylvania Law School

Arti K. Rai
Elvin R. Latty Professor of Law, Duke University Law School

Steven S. Weiner
Partner, Davis Polk & Wardwell

Terry Winograd
Professor of Computer Science, Stanford University


Tilo Bachmann
Administrator, European Patent Office


Tilo Bachmann is member of the European Patent Office's Controlling Office, a direct support unit of the President. In his function as controller and adviser, he works on economic, policy and operational issues of the patent office and system. At this he is also responsible for specific intellectual property issues related to small and medium enterprises (SMEs).

He was trained at University of Karlsruhe in Germany, University of Salamanca and CEU Madrid, both in Spain. He holds master degrees in business and economic science and industrial engineering.

Prior to joining the European Patent Office, Tilo worked over several years as a management consultant at Bain & Company across Europe, the US and Latin America. He served mainly clients in the high-tech, telecommunication and private equity/venture capital industry, focusing on strategy and business development, M&A and turnaround management. Before, amongst others, he also worked as analyst for a successful Germany-based Internet company.


Robert Barr
Executive Director, Berkeley Center for Law & Technology, Berkeley Law School
Former Vice President for Intellectual Property & Worldwide Patent Counsel, Cisco


Robert Barr is the executive director of the Berkeley Center for Law & Technology. Formerly, he was vice president for intellectual property and worldwide patent counsel for Cisco Systems in San Jose, California, where he was responsible for all patent prosecution, licensing and litigation.

Barr has taught at University of California, Berkeley School of Law (Boalt Hall) and at Hastings College of the Law, where he was an adjunct professor of patent law from 1994 to 1999.

A frequent speaker on patent reform, Barr has testified twice at the Federal Trade Commission hearings on Competition and Intellectual Property Law and Policy in the Knowledge-Based Economy. He was named by the Daily Journal as one of the top 25 intellectual property lawyers in California in 2003, and as one of the top 10 in-house intellectual property lawyers in 2004.


John Bracken
Program Officer, MacArthur Foundation


John S. Bracken is a Program Officer at the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. He works on the Foundation's media grantmaking, which supports social-issue media projects and public media; its initiative on intellectual property and the public domain, and other areas of special interest to the Foundation. He also chairs the Foundation's Technology Grants Committee. Previously, he worked at the Ford Foundation as a program associate on its portfolios in news media and media policy and technology. He has also worked for the Center for Media Education, where he analyzed the social impact of new technologies and managed a series of media research projects for the Center for Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania. He has a Masters Degree from the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania and a Bachelors Degree from Pitzer College in Claremont, California. His personal blog is bracken.wordpress.com.


Dennis Crouch
Patently-O
Visiting Assistant, Professor Boston University Law School
Associate, McDonnell Boehnen Hulbert & Berghoff LLP


Dennis Crouch is a visiting faculty member at Boston University Law School and serves as of counsel at the law firm of McDonnell Boehnen Hulbert & Berghoff LLP in Chicago where his practice focuses primarily on patent litigation and patent prosecution. Dennis has written extensively on issues involving patent and intellectual property law. Notably, he is the author of the popular award winning patent law blog Patently-O. Additionally, he co-authors bi-annual updates to the book Patent Application Practice (West).

As a patent attorney, Dennis has worked with various technologies including mechanical devices, computer memory and hardware, circuit design, software, networking, mobile and IP telephony, automotive/construction/agriculture technologies, lens manufacture, bearings, farming equipment, HVAC systems, and business methods.

Dennis received his BSE from the department of mechanical and aerospace engineering cum laude at Princeton University, where he also earned a certificate in engineering management systems. His thesis involving internet-based autonomous learning systems was awarded special distinction. Dennis then earned his JD cum laude from the University of Chicago Law School. While at the University of Chicago, he was a Microsoft, Merck, & Pfizer scholar, a member of the Olin program in law and economics, and a leader of the Intellectual Property Law Society.

Prior to joining MBHB, Dennis worked as a technical consultant for manufacturing firms in New England, as a research fellow at NASA's Glenn Research Center, as a software developer at the Mayo Clinic's department of biomedical imaging, and as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Ghana, West Africa. Dennis Crouch grew up on a farm near Pittsburg, Kansas.


Sean Dennehey


Sean joined the Office in 1978 with a degree in Natural Sciences to work as a patent examiner.

Since then, Sean has worked in different parts of the Office, including the Search and Advisory Service, and its Policy Directorate, which he helped set up.

Sean became Divisional Director in the Patents Directorate in 1996. He led the Patents Legal section and one of its patent examining divisions, as well as being a tribunal Hearing Officer.

Sean became Director of Patents in March 2004.




John Duffy
Professor of Law, George Washington University Law School


Professor Duffy joined the faculty in 2003. After receiving an undergraduate degree in physics, he served as articles editor on the University of Chicago Law Review and was awarded an Olin Fellowship in Law and Economics. Professor Duffy clerked for Judge Stephen Williams on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit and for Justice Antonin Scalia on the U.S. Supreme Court, served as an attorney adviser in the Department of Justice's Office of Legal Counsel, and practiced law with the Washington firm of Covington & Burling. Since entering academia in 1996, Professor Duffy has been on the faculty of the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law and the William and Mary School of Law, and has also served as a visiting professor at the University of Chicago. He has published articles in the University of Chicago Law Review, Columbia Law Review, Texas Law Review, and Supreme Court Review, and he is the co-author of a casebook on patent law. Professor Duffy teaches torts, administrative law, patent law, and international intellectual property law.


Will Fitzpatrick
Corporate Counsel, Omidyar Network


Will's role as Omidyar Network's corporate counsel allows him to combine his experience as a technology and business lawyer with his commitment to progressive social change. Prior to joining Omidyar Network, Will ran a solo law practice in San Francisco and represented a diverse group of technology companies on issues related to Internet and electronic commerce law, the creation and protection of intellectual property, and general corporate matters. Before entering solo practice, he served as in-house counsel, first for @Home Corporation (Excite@Home) and then for Loudcloud, Inc. Will started his legal career in the Bay Area as an associate at the law firm of Fenwick & West. Prior to and during law school, Will worked for the Alabama Capital Representation Resource Center (now the Equal Justice Initiative of Alabama), helping to provide post-conviction legal assistance to death row inmates in Alabama. Immediately after law school, he served as a law clerk for Chief Judge Myron H. Thompson of the United States District Court for the Middle District of Alabama. Will received a bachelor's degree with honors from Harvard College in 1989 and a law degree from Columbia University in 1994.


Alan Kasper
Vice President of the Board of Directors, AIPLA
Partner, Sughrue Mion, PLLC


Alan Kasper is the director of the firm's International Department and a member of the firm's Management Committee. Mr. Kasper's practice includes domestic and international patent law. He represents clients in litigation, renders opinions on patentability, validity and infringement and provides counseling on matters involving licensing, proprietary rights protection, contracting and export control. He advises clients engaged in electrical, semiconductor, network, software/computer-based and mechanical technologies and provides counsel on business method patents inventions. Mr. Kasper was the resident partner in the firm's Tokyo office (1990-1994). Prior to joining the firm, Mr. Kasper served as the Chief Patent Counsel for Communications Satellite Corporation (COMSAT), and earlier, as a Patent Examiner in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.


Stephen G. Kunin
Special Counsel, Oblon Spivak
Former Deputy Commissioner for Patent Examination Policy, USPTO


Stephen G. Kunin is the former Deputy Commissioner for Patent Examination Policy with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. He has more than 30 years of expertise in intellectual property rights protection and 24 years of organizational management and leadership experience. He was appointed to his former position in March 2000 and has served in a similar capacity since November 1994, under the position's prior title, "Deputy Assistant Commissioner for Patent Policy and Projects." Previously, beginning in July 1989, Mr. Kunin served as Deputy Assistant Commissioner for Patents. He participated in the establishment of patent policy for the various Patent Organizations under the Commissioner for Patents, including changes in patent practice, revision of rules of practice and procedures, establishment of examining priorities and classification of technological arts, and oversaw the operations of the Office of Patent Legal Administration, Patent Cooperation Treaty Legal Administration, and the Office of Petitions. Additionally, in January 1993, Mr. Kunin was designated by the Secretary of Commerce to perform the functions of the Assistant Commissioner for Patents on an acting basis until a new Assistant Commissioner for Patents was appointed in 1994.

Mr. Kunin joined the Patent and Trademark Office (PTO) as a patent examiner in June of 1970. In March of 1977, he became a Senior Examiner in a technology of master's level complexity. He became Director of the Manufacturing Group in May of 1983. When a new Electrical Communications examining group (Group 260) was formed in April of 1984, he became its first Group Director.

Mr. Kunin has assumed many leadership roles for the Office, including chairing the Patent Examiner Evaluation Board. Among his responsibilities, in addition to overseeing the Patent Examination Policy activities: serving on the USPTO Management Council, the PTO committee on Discipline, and the USPTO Executive Committee. He also coordinated several of the Trilateral Projects under the jurisdiction of the Commissioner. He has been a guest lecturer at a number of prestigious law schools.

Mr. Kunin graduated with honors from Washington University in May of 1970 with a B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering. He attended the National Law Center of the George Washington University, receiving his Juris Doctor degree in law with honors in May of 1975. He is a graduate of the Harvard University Kennedy School of Government SMG Program and is also a member of the Virginia State Bar and the bar of the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. He is registered to practice as a patent attorney before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

Mr. Kunin has received numerous awards during his career at the USPTO, including four Gold Medals, four Silver Medals and a Bronze medal from the Department of Commerce, a USPTO Career Achievement Award and the Vice President's Reinventing Government Hammer Award. In 2001 he was named by Intellectual Property Today magazine as one of the most influential people in IP law and was the recipient of the Meritorious Executive Presidential Rank Award. In the February 2002 issue of the Practicing Law Company's magazine "Global Counsel" he was named as one of the most inspiring regulators in the federal government.

Mr. Kunin has been named the Director of the J.D. and LL.M. Programs in Intellectual Property Law at the George Mason University School of Law. He also has been named to the Editorial Board of the AIPLA Quarterly Law Journal and as an Advisory Committee Member for CASRIP ( The Center for the Advanced Studies and Research on Intellectual Property ) at the University of Washington School of Law in Seattle, Washington.

In addition, Mr. Kunin performs expert witness services on patent practice and procedure.


Mark Lemley
Director, Stanford Program in Law, Science and Technology
William H. Neukom Professor of Law, Stanford Law School


Widely recognized as a preeminent scholar of intellectual property law, Mark Lemley is a prolific writer, having published over 70 articles and six books, and an accomplished litigator, having tried cases before the U.S. Supreme Court, the California Supreme Court, and federal district courts. His major contributions to legal scholarship focus on how the economics and technology of the Internet affect patent law, copyright law, and trademark law. Professor Lemley has testified numerous times before Congress and the California legislature on patent, trade secret, antitrust, and constitutional law matters and currently serves as of counsel at Keker & Van Nest in their intellectual property and antitrust divisions. Before joining the Stanford Law School faculty in 2004, he was a professor of law at the University of California at Berkeley School of Law (Boalt Hall) and at the University of Texas School of Law, and served as of counsel at Fish & Richardson. He clerked for Judge Dorothy W. Nelson of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.


Stephen A. Merrill
Executive Director, Science, Technology and Economic Policy, National Academies


Stephen Merrill has been Executive Director of the National Academies'* Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy (STEP) since its formation in 1991. With the sponsorship of a growing number of federal government agencies, foundations, multinational corporations in various sectors, and international institutions, he has developed the STEP program into an important discussion forum and authoritative voice on technology and other microeconomic policies technical standards, trade, taxation, human resources, regulation, and statistical as well as research and development policies. At the same time he has directed several STEP projects and publications, including Investing in Productivity and Prosperity (1994), Improving America's Schools (1995), Industrial Research and Innovation Indicators (1997), Borderline Case: International Tax Policy, Corporate Research and Development, and Investment (1997), and U.S. Industry in 2000: Studies in Competitive Performance and Securing America's Industrial Strength (1999). He is currently managing a three-year study of intellectual property policies. His analysis (with Michael McGeary) of the changing field distribution of federal research support in the 1990s appeared in the September 10, 1999, issue of Science and has been cited in numerous discussions of trends in public research and development investment.

Dr. Merrill's association with the National Academies began in 1985, when he was principal consultant on the Academy report, Balancing the National Interest: National Security Export Controls and Global Economic Competition. As a consultant he also contributed to Academy studies in the areas of science policy, manufacturing, and competitiveness. In 1987 he was appointed to direct the Academies' first government and congressional liaison office, and until July 1995 he served concurrently as Executive Director of the STEP Board and the Office of Government and External Affairs. During his tenure in the latter position the Academies received a steadily increasing number of congressional requests for policy advice.

Previously, Dr. Merrill was a Fellow in International Business at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), where he specialized in technology trade issues. His publications include The United States and the New Technological Competition in the CSIS Significant Issues Series, Securing Technological Advantage: Balancing Export Controls and Innovation (editor), and The Great Trade Debate for the Roosevelt Center for American Policy Studies.

For seven years until 1981, he served on various congressional staffs, most recently that of the Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee, where he organized the first congressional hearings on international competition in biotechnology and microelectronics and was responsible for legislation on technological innovation and the allocation of intellectual property rights arising from government-sponsored research.

Dr. Merrill holds degrees in political science from Columbia (B.A., summa cum laude), Oxford (M. Phil.), and Yale (M.A. and Ph.D.) Universities. In 1992 he attended the Senior Managers in Government Program of the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. From 1989 to 1996 he was an adjunct professor of international affairs at Georgetown University.


Michael V. Messinger
Director, Sterne, Kessler Goldstein, & Fox P.L.L.C.


Michael Messinger is a director in the Electronics Group. He works with company managers, directors and employees to identify and leverage intellectual property assets. He has extensive experience in prosecuting U.S. and international patent applications and developing strategic patent portfolios. He has written and prosecuted numerous patent applications including those related to computer networking (Internet, World-Wide Web, Java technologies), communications protocols, high-speed optical communications, photonics, graphics processing, data mining, voice-over-IP, cryptography, spread spectrum technology, and multi-processor computer architecture. He has handled complex patent matters involving appeals reissue and re-examination. Mr. Messinger has also provided infringement and validity analysis in opinion work and in support of litigation for computer-related patents.

Prior to joining Sterne Kessler, Mr. Messinger worked as a patent agent. He was a patent examiner for over six years in Group 2500 (Radiant Energy) at the United States Patent and Trademark Office. He examined patent applications and granted U.S. patents covering a variety of optical electronic circuits and systems including video camera inspection systems, scanners, fiber optic sensors, imaging CCD arrays, and photosensitive semiconductor junctions. Mr. Messinger regularly publishes and speaks on emerging topics in patent strategy and practice in the United States and abroad.

Mr. Messinger taught for several years at the United States Patent and Trademark Office, University and Northern Virginia Community College in the areas of patent law, intellectual property law, and business organization. He currently is an adjunct professor for Patent Application Drafting at George Mason School of Law. Mr. Messinger is an officer and member of the Giles S. Rich American Inn of Court.

Mr. Messinger graduated from Duke University in 1985 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Physics. He received his J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center in 1995. He is a registered U.S. patent attorney and is admitted to the District of Columbia bar.


Marcus Mueller
EPO Scenarios for the Future Project, European Patent Office


PhD in Polymer Chemistry, trained as a European patent attorney at Akzo Nobel, the Netherlands, currently working at the European Patent Office as Examiner, member of a committee for the European Qualifying Examination for European patent attorney candidates and scenario writer within the EPO Scenarios for the Future Project.




Gideon Parchomovsky
Professor of Law, University of Pennsylvania Law School


Gideon Parchomovsky specializes in intellectual property, property law, and cyber law. Parchomovsky has already made significant contributions to the field through his wide-ranging scholarship, having written numerous articles for major law reviews on liability rules, insider trading, trademarks, domain names, internal auctions and the integration game. Most recently, he has been advocating the need for a comprehensive property theory and the need to introduce a value-oriented theory. Parchomovsky has also received the A. Leo Levin Award which is given to the best first year course teacher.




Arti K. Rai
Professor of Law, Duke University Law School


Arti Rai is an expert in patent law, law and the biopharmaceutical industry, and health care regulation. Her recent publications include "Who's Afraid of the APA? What the Patent System Can Learn from Administrative Law" 95 Georgetown Law Journal __ (forthcoming 2006) (with Stuart Benjamin); "Open and Collaborative Research: A New Model for Biomedicine," in Intellectual Property Rights in Frontier Industries: Biotech and Software (AEI-Brookings Press, 2005); "Finding Cures for Tropical Diseases: Is Open Source an Answer?" Public Library of Science: Medicine (2004) (with Stephen M. Maurer and Andrej Sali); "Collective Action and Proprietary Rights: The Case of Biotechnology Research with Low Commercial Value," in International Public Goods and Transfer of Technology under a Globalized Intellectual Property Regime (Cambridge Univ. Press, 2005); and "Engaging Facts and Policy: A Multi-Institutional Approach to Patent System Reform," 106 Columbia Law Review (2003).

Professor Rai joined the Duke Law faculty in 2003. In the fall of 2004, Rai was a Visiting Professor at Yale Law School. Prior to joining Duke, she was on the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania Law School, where she was also a visiting professor in Fall 2000. From 1997-2001, she was a faculty member at the University of San Diego School of Law. She has also been a faculty fellow in the Program in Ethics and the Professions at Harvard University; a MacLean fellow at the University of Chicago Center for Clinical Medical Ethics; and a trial attorney focused on health law at the United States Department of Justice, Civil Division, Federal Programs Branch. She was an associate at the firm of Jenner & Block, in Washington D.C., after completing a clerkship with Judge Marilyn Hall Patel on the United States District Court for the Northern District of California in San Francisco.

Rai graduated from Harvard College, magna cum laude, with a B.A. in biochemistry and history (history and science), attended Harvard Medical School for the 1987-1988 academic year, and received her J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School in 1991. While in law school, she served as executive editor for the Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review.


Steven S. Weiner
Partner, Davis Polk & Wardwell


Steven Weiner is a member of Davis Polk & Wardwell's Corporate Department and practices in the Menlo Park office, spearheading the firm's intellectual property (IP) practice. He has in-depth experience advising technology and media companies and their stakeholders on complex, business-critical IP matters, including: analyzing competitive patent landscapes; building and evaluating business-aligned patent portfolios; developing IP strategies for standards, open source and other complex licensing scenarios; enforcing valuable IP assets; assessing, avoiding and responding to third-party IP threats; and negotiating IP asset transactions, including mergers and acquisitions, spinoffs, license and distribution agreements, joint ventures, joint technology development and strategic alliances. His clients are a diverse group of industry leaders and innovators, including Yahoo!, Comcast, SGI, Affymetrix and Form Factor; leading investment firms; and early-stage ventures and non-profits at the cutting edge of research and development.

Mr. Weiner joined Davis Polk in 2002 after serving as vice president for intellectual property and strategic planning at SRI International, an independent non-profit research and development institute. He held senior responsibility for growing and cultivating SRI's diverse portfolio of IP assets, and for exploiting those assets through new ventures and license transactions. He also successfully directed SRI's internal strategic investments in new technologies, stimulating value creation and business growth.

Before joining SRI, Mr. Weiner was senior intellectual property counsel at SGI, where he rapidly developed an aggressive software patent portfolio that was subsequently sold to Microsoft for $60 million. Prior to that he practiced for five years with Irell & Manella, focusing on IP litigation and counseling, and was a member of the trial team that in 1994 successfully obtained a jury verdict of over $100 million in favor of Stac Electronics against Microsoft based on software patent infringements.

Mr. Weiner graduated, summa cum laude, from the University of Pennsylvania in 1985 and in 1987 received a master's degree in electrical engineering and computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He received his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School in 1990. He is a registered U.S. patent attorney and is admitted to the bar of California.


Terry Winograd
Professor of Computer Science, Stanford University


Professor Winograd's focus is on human-computer interaction design, with a focus on the theoretical background and conceptual models. He directs the teaching programs and HCI research in the Stanford Human-Computer Interaction Group. He is also a founding faculty member of the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford (the "d.school").

Winograd was a founding member and past president of Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility. He is on a number of journal editorial boards, including Human Computer Interaction, ACM Transactions on Computer Human Interaction, and Informatica.


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